Last edited by Malanos
Monday, August 3, 2020 | History

2 edition of Transfer of Naval Seaplane NC-4 to Smithsonian Institution. found in the catalog.

Transfer of Naval Seaplane NC-4 to Smithsonian Institution.

Transfer of Naval Seaplane NC-4 to Smithsonian Institution.

Report on the Bill (H.R. 2493) "To Provide for the Transfer of the Naval Seaplane Known and Designated as "NC-4" to the Smithsonian Institution"

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Published by U.S. G.P.O. in Washington .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Seaplanes -- Navy

  • Edition Notes

    StatementUnited States House Committee on Naval Affairs, Sixty-Seventh Congress, first session
    ContributionsUnited States. Congress. House. Committee on Naval Affairs
    The Physical Object
    FormatMicroform
    Paginationp. 357
    Number of Pages357
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL15288020M

    Naval War College Henry E. Eccles Library Cushing Road Newport, RI The Naval Historical Collection, the depository for the Naval War College archives, manuscript materials, and special collections, was established in as a division of the Naval War College Library. From the beginning, two types of documents were collected: the primary topic is the history of naval .   The NC-4 began its journey on 8 May —accompanied by the NC-3 and NC-1 (the NC-2 had been cannibalized to repair parts of the NC-1 before the journey started)—at Naval Air Station Rockaway, New York, before flying on to Newfoundland, on 15 May.

    The USAF transferred the aircraft to the Smithsonian Institution in but it remained in storage at Park Ridge, Illinois, until transfer to the Garber Facility in January This aircraft is stored in the National Air and Space Museum (NASM), Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center, Washington Dulles International Airport, Chantilly, Virginia. Number of Visitors who visited Ship and Boat Plans from the Smithsonian from the Boat Design Directory: *Note: Site may be listed in multiple categories, and .

    (Resource Credit: The Curtiss Aeroplane and Motor Corp. National Naval Aviation Museum NC-4 Files. ) 23 May years ago NC-4 was in the Azores, waiting to complete the next leg to Lisbon on her transatlantic flight, the first flight across. We stopped by to visit and take a few more pictures for a book we are writing. The Aeronautics Department initiated a new aviation book series, Famous Aircraft of the National Air and Space Museum, and plans were made to issue a bibliography called a Guide to Aerospace History Sources. In NASM announced the establishment of the National Air and Space Archives, a national center for research in aerospace history.


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Transfer of Naval Seaplane NC-4 to Smithsonian Institution Download PDF EPUB FB2

The NC-4 was a Curtiss NC flying boat that was the first aircraft to fly across the Atlantic Ocean, albeit not non-stop. The NC designation was derived from the collaborative efforts of the Navy (N) and Curtiss (C).

The NC series flying boats were designed to meet wartime needs, and after the end of World War I they were sent overseas to validate the design cturer: Curtiss Aeroplane and Motor Company. The NC-4 made a triumphal return to the USA later, ending a celebratory tour of the eastern and southern seaboard by flying up the Mississippi to St.

Louis. Here it was handed over to the Smithsonian Institution. Later it was given to the Naval Air Museum in Pensacola, Florida and is currently on display. The aircraft went to Naval Air Station (NAS) Port Columbus, located on the same airfield, three days later.

In June, it was at San Diego where it was prepared for transfer to Guam in the Pacific Theater for assignment to a Carrier Air Service Unit, arriving there in July.

Rear Admiral Albert C. Read () graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in and became Naval Aviator #24 in July InRead was the commander of the Curtiss NC-4, the first aircraft to fly across the Atlantic.

The NC-4 covered nautical miles, from Nova Scotia to the Azores. InRead was the commander of the Curtiss NC-4, the first aircraft to fly across the Atlantic. The NC-4 covered nautical miles, from Nova Scotia to the Azores.

The NC-4 was joined in the flight by the Curtiss NC-1 and Curtiss NC-3, but both the NC-1 and NC-3 were forced to land in the open sea. The Navy sprouted wings two years later in with a number of significant firsts.

The first U.S Navy officers were trained to fly, the Navy purchased its first airplanes from Glenn Curtiss and the Wrights, and sites for naval aircraft operations were established at Annapolis, Md., and at North Island, San Diego, Ca. The collection includes books on lighter-than-air history naval history, and engineering.

A number of the books have been transferred to the NASM branch of the Smithsonian Institution Libraries; others were transferred with the permission of the Fulton family to other institutions. Prof. Langley of the Smithsonian Institution was the first person to construct an airplane possessing inherent stability.

On May 6, an airplane model equipped with a steam engine was successfully launched and flown, making three and a quarter turns. Tandem wings and a horizontal tail surface provided longitudinal stability, a strong.

The Smithsonian Institution restored the NC-4 in time for the 50 th anniversary celebration and put it on display on the National Mall. Coverage of the 50th anniversary in Naval Aviation News.

About. The Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center near Washington Dulles International Airport is the companion facility to the museum in Washington, D.C. Hundreds of historically significant air- and spacecraft, along with thousands of small artifacts, are on display in an open, hangar-like setting.

A century after it became the first aircraft to fly across the Atlantic Ocean, the NC-4 at the National Naval Aviation Museum still symbolizes the spirit of exploration. The NC-4 is property of the Smithsonian Institution, since it was given to that institution by the Navy after its return home.

However, this aircraft was too large to be housed in either the older Smithsonian Arts & Industries Building in Washington, D.C., or in its successor, the completed National Air and Space Museum main building.

Spitfire () by Smithsonian Replica SeriesItem Number: SL-SPFPart of the Smithsonian Museum Replica Series, this value priced, 1/48 scale, die cast model of a Spitfire flown by No. Squadron Leader Richard Newbery features textured surfaces, a glazed canopy, a rotating propeller, authentic markings, a Spitfire collector's card, and more.9 1/4" wingspan; includes a.

historic flight, the original NC-4 aircraft is on view to the public. The foot giant, recently restored to mint condition by the National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution, is once again on display in Washington, D.C.

— a tribute to an American achievement and to the men who built and flew her. The collection includes books on lighter-than-air history naval history, and engineering. A number of the books have been transferred to the NASM branch of the Smithsonian Institution Libraries; others were transferred with the permission of the Fulton family to other institutions.

Several books with personal. The NC-4 completed the flight successfully, reaching Plymouth, England via Lisbon, Portugal, on Following publicity tours of the Atlantic and Gulf coasts of the United States, the NC-4 was given to the Smithsonian Institution and is a part of the National Air and Space Museum collection.

The NC-4 returned from Europe and was put on display in New York’s Central Park, and in several other locations, including Philadelphia and Washington, D.C. The NC-4 was obtained by the Smithsonian Institution in Only the hull was exhibited due to the lack of facilities to display the aircraft in its entirety.

Hill Goodspeed, a historian at the National Naval Aviation Museum, walks by the NC-4 on display in the Pensacola, Florida, museum virtually every day. On loan from the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum since“it is the defining aircraft that visitors see when entering the museum,” he says.

Not until did the Smithsonian acquire all of the components of the famous seaplane, placing it in storage at the institution’s preservation facility at Silver Hill, Maryland.

Eight years later, following an extensive restoration, it was displayed on The Mall in Washington D.C. to commemorate the 5oth anniversary of its historic flight. Glenn Hammond Curtiss ( – J ) was an American aviation and motorcycling pioneer, and a founder of the U.S.

aircraft industry. He began his career as a bicycle racer and builder before moving on to motorcycles. As early ashe began to manufacture engines for airships. Creator: Whitman, Roger B. Search this Names: Blériot, Louis, Search this Curtiss, Glenn Hammond, Search this Farman, Henry Search this Latham, Hubert Search this Paulhan, Louis Search this Whitman, Roger B.

Search this Wright, Orville, Search this Wright, Wilbur, Search this Extent.The US Air Force transferred the aircraft to the Smithsonian Institution in but it remained in storage at Park Ridge, Illinois, until transfer to the Garber Facility in January National Air and Space Museum, Steven F.

Udvar-Hazy Center, Washington Dulles International Airport, Chantilly, Virginia.As with Trimble’s book Admiral William A. Moffett: Architect of Naval Aviation (Smithsonian Institution Press, ), readers who seek insight into the subject’s family life will be disappointed. This is no “there I was” study.